Your Election Guide – Part Three

The Concord Bridge is publishing this voter guide and encouraging all registered voters to vote early, vote by mail or go to the polls on Nov. 8. Early voting in Concord starts Friday, Oct. 22. For more information from Secretary of State William Galvin, go to sec.state.ma.us

Ballot Questions

Question 1. A proposed amendment to the state constitution to levy an additional tax on income over one million dollars. A yes vote would impose a 4 percent tax on that portion of income over $1M. A no vote would make no change in the state constitution relative to income tax.

Question 2. Regulation of dental insurance. Passage of this question (a yes vote) would regulate dental insurance rates, including by requiring companies to spend at least 83 percent of premiums on member dental expenses and other improvements instead of administrative expenses and other changes to dental insurance regulations. A no vote would make no change in the law relative to the regulations that apply to dental insurance companies.

Question 3. Expanded availability of licenses for the sale of alcoholic beverages. A yes vote would increase the number of licenses a retailer could have for the sale of alcohol, limit the number of “all-alcoholic beverages” licenses, restrict use of self-checkout, and require retailers to accept customer’s out-of-state identification. A no vote would make no change in the laws governing the retail sale of alcoholic beverages.

Question 4. Eligibility for driver’s licenses. A yes vote would keep in place the law, which would allow Massachusetts residents who cannot provide proof of lawful presence in the United States to obtain a driver’s license or permit if they meet the other requirements for doing so. A no vote would repeal this law.


The Concord Bridge is publishing this voter guide and encouraging all registered voters to vote early, vote by mail or go to the polls on Nov. 8. Early voting in Concord starts Friday, Oct. 22. For more information from Secretary of State William Galvin, go to sec.state.ma.us

Carmine Gentile, Sudbury, 13th Middlesex district, Democrat, unopposed

Personal:

Incumbent State Rep. candidate Carmine Gentile, 68, grew up in Watertown and moved to Sudbury 41 years ago. He is a former Town Meeting member in Watertown and has served on the FinCom and Planning Board in Sudbury. For 20 years, Gentile has served on the Sudbury Town Democratic Committee. He is a member of the Sudbury Housing Trust and Council on Aging. He is serving his 4th term as State Rep. In a district that was redrawn to include two precincts in Concord.

Why is he running for another term:

Gentile said he got interested in politics as a 14-year-old when family members went to Vietnam and Thailand to fight in the war. Opposed to the war, he went to Washington D.C. as a teenager to protest. “I’ve been politically active ever since,” he said. He has served on and chaired the Sudbury Town Democratic Committee and at the State House, Gentile has worked with other reps on bills involving affordable housing. He serves on the Sudbury Affordable Housing Trust. “Being active locally informs my work at the state level,” he said. In the Legislature, Gentile has the longest tenure on the Committee on Elder Affairs.

What is his familiarity with local issues:

“Concord is a wonderful town,” said Gentile, acknowledging that he wants to get to know the town and the issues that top the news among voters. “I’m here to listen,” he said. He is interested in addressing affordable housing and the environment.

Ballot questions: Question 1. Yes. He said it would apply to about 19,000 Massachusetts residents. Question 2. Yes. Question 4. No. “Bigger isn’t always better,” he said of the proposed law to broaden the number of alcoholic licenses available to retailers and town governments. Question 4. Yes.

Town Clerk prepared for Nov 8 election

Kaari Tari said voters should feel confident as they go to the polls on Nov. 8. “We have a great team of election workers to help maintain neutrality in the polling places while helping voters navigate the voting process,” she noted recently. She said police officers are stationed at each voting location to ensure that voters and election workers are free from interference. Further, Tari said observers are allowed in the polling location but must remain behind a six-foot buffer around the polling place set-up. “This will allow them to hear and view activities within the polling place, but not interfere with any part of the process,” she said.

There is also a 150’ buffer around each building that is the site of a polling location, limiting electioneering, defined as campaigning for candidates, to outside of that area. Campaign pins or attire of any kind are not allowed within the buffer area and prohibited inside the polling location.

Tari said her office received calls about Question 4 on the ballot that was not included in the booklet sent to all residents. She said a link to the question is available by going to the town website www.concordma.gov along with sample ballots and early voting dates.

Early voting begins Oct. 22, and continues Monday through Saturday until Friday, Nov. 4. Check the website for hours.

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